Conservation and water reuse are critical ways North Texas Municipal Water District (NTMWD) manages a finite supply of water.

Conservation not only helps extend water supplies during frequent Texas droughts, it is also critical to meet future water demands because the population in our service area is expected to more than double in the next 50 years.

We are counting on water conservation as the source for nearly one quarter of our future water supplies. We do this by providing simple, hands-on tips to use our most precious resource more efficiently.

Since water projects require significant investment to build and take many years to gain approvals and construct, conservation helps stretch existing supplies for the communities that we serve. When you use water wisely, it allows us to delay costly water projects needed to meet regional water demands. And, it can help you manage your monthly water bill. When we all use water wisely and efficiently, we all win.

Our water conservation and water resource/emergency management plan outlines strategies we use to conserve and protect our water supply. Please check with your city water department or water supplier for any additional guidelines in place for your community. View plans below:

NTMWD Water Resources Management Plan
Draft Model Water Resources Management Plan
NTMWD Water Conservation Plan
Draft Model Water Conservation Plan

WATER RESOURCE RECOVERY & REUSE

Wastewater reuse is an important component of our long-range water conservation plan. NTMWD operates the largest indirect wastewater effluent recovery program in Texas, diverting and retreating more than 14 billion gallons annually.

Like most wastewater service providers, we treat wastewater to meet or exceed quality standards and return it to rivers, streams and other waterways. The treated wastewater return flows, or effluent, blend with other supplies which can all be used again by other communities downstream. This is a way of indirectly reusing the water. Each day, we pump more than 40 million gallons of treated effluent from the Wilson Creek Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant to Lavon Lake, providing us with additional water supply for our growing region.